Image by Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie (Seminole/Muskogee/Dine)

Image by Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie (Seminole/Muskogee/Dine)

Working with clay brings back memories of my extended families, and other community members who are all gone now.”
— Ignacia Duran

ignacia duran

 

TRIBE: Tesuque Pueblo

MEDIUM: Pottery

LOCATION: Tesuque, New Mexico

 

2003 COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD HONOREE

 

“Working with clay brings back memories of my extended families, and other community members who are all gone now. What they taught me while working with clay extends into many facets of Tesuque culture and lifeways. As we worked with clay We also shared information about the past, not just how to work with clay but also the oral histories, cooking and the value of our traditions. So today in the same way, I share my knowledge, stories and folklore with who ever comes to sit with me while I work. I feel it is in this time-honored way that I carry and pass on the traditions of my people. Through the practice of clay art I have been able to recreate some of the old kiva pots that have been broken.” – Ignacia Duran

“Mrs. Duran exemplifies the kind of native woman who’s strength of character, creativity and service to her community serves as a model to others. To create beautiful vessels and figurative forms from clay is an achievement, to share her talent with younger people and others in her community is a testament to her sense of Pueblo culture. Mrs. Duran is a cultural resource none of us should ever take for granted. Her storytelling is an art form. Her clay forms express a solid connection to a way of life that makes so much practical, cultural and religious sense. Mrs. Duran like the clay forms she creates, has created in herself a complete person.” – Nora Naranjo-Morse, nominator