Image by Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie (Seminole/Muskogee/Dine)

Image by Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie (Seminole/Muskogee/Dine)

Knowledge of the land, the cycles of the plants, the seasons, the weather, how the material can be manipulated into the piece and how to honor these living things must be taught to the artist. Each piece will contain a part of the maker’s spirit as well as the spirit of all the things that are used in the completed piece.”
— Kathy Wallace

kathy wallace

 

TRIBE: Karuk/Yurok/Hupa

MEDIUM: Basketry

LOCATION: Fairfield, California

 

2002 COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD HONOREE

2003 CULTURAL CAPITAL FELLOW

 

“Long before a weaver or regalia maker sits down to put together the materials into a beautiful piece of art, he/she has developed a relationship with the plants and animals from which they came. Knowledge of the land, the cycles of the plants, the seasons, the weather, how the material can be manipulated into the piece and how to honor these living things must be taught to the artist. Each piece will contain a part of the maker's spirit as well as the spirit of all the things that are used in the completed piece. The spiritual ties these things make us have respect for the plants, the animals and the land. The artist or traditional practitioner commits himself to keeping these things healthy, learns not to exploit or waste any of these things, and in turn, passes down this respect to his or her children, students, and those who will own or use these beautiful things.” – Kathy Wallace

“She has made many weavers feel accomplished in their traditional basketweaving by being able to work with the traditional materials, but living away from their homeland. She understands the importance of who she is and where her family is from and holds true to their most valued traditions. Kathy is definitely a Keeper of Traditions.” – Jennifer Dawn Bates, nominator