NEW WEBSITE LAUNCHED

First Peoples Fund has launched a new website, which builds on the organization’s efforts to reach a national audience with its mission of preserving and advancing Native American arts and culture. Visitors can now check it out at http://www.firstpeoplesfund.org. The launch coincided with the release of the market study in Santa Fe on Friday, August 16, 2013.

“We are thrilled to have this enhanced communication tool to share our story with people across the country—even world,” said Lori Pourier, president. “Our new site features our programs and our artists in a new way, and we hope it becomes yet another resource that strengthens our mission.”

The site, designed and developed by The Numad Group, features profiles on artists involved in the organization’s numerous grant programs, including the Artist in Business Leadership Fellowship, and Cultural Capital and Our Nation’s Spaces Grant Programs. It also highlights recipients of the Community Spirit Awards. These profiles are sprinkled throughout the site, introducing visitors to the people at the heart of the organization.

“We will continue to build our collection of stories of artists who have dedicated their lives and work to sustaining and passing down Native art and culture,” added Peter Strong, vice president of operations and programs, who led the project.

The new site also has a vibrant design and more photography, a regularly updated news and events section, areas to donate and get involved, access to social media channels, and in-depth information about First Peoples Fund grant and training programs. Artists and organizations wishing to apply for a grant will be able to do so online in the near future.

“This will enhance our grant application process, making it as seamless as possible,” Strong said.

The new website goes hand-in-hand with the organization’s ongoing efforts to expand its reach—serving artists and tribal communities across the country.

“We hope that the new site will provide a centralized online hub to celebrate the work of Native artists,” Pourier said, “and that it will foster better communication, marketing and resources for those artists.”