Image by Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie (Seminole/Muskogee/Dine)

Image by Hulleah Tsinhnahjinnie (Seminole/Muskogee/Dine)

Through the knowledge of our ancestors, we perpetuate our traditional teachings of how to take care of our land and ourselves.”
— Rodney Cawston

rodney cawston

 

TRIBE: Okanogan/Nez Perce

MEDIUM: Beadwork, Weaving

LOCATION: Coulee Dam, Washington

 

2002 COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD HONOREE

 

“My people have a traditional teaching that each of us were given special and unique gifts, it is up to us to develop these talents and to pursue the things that we like to do. I share this message as often as I can. I teach our young people to follow the things that interest them the most. I know that there is revitalization and a resurgence of our people to learn more about themselves and their ancestors. Through the knowledge of our ancestors, we perpetuate our traditional teachings of how to take care of our land and ourselves.” – Rodney Cawston

“Although his talents are multi-faceted, he is instrumental in reviving plateau twined cornhusk bags. He has generously shared his knowledge by teaching weaving in local schools and by doing presentations at basketry gatherings, museums through out the Northwest. Even having experienced all of this, it is not uncommon for him, even after a hard day at work, to drive to an elders home with all materials needed, to teach corn husk weaving for a few hours.” – Elaine Timentwa Emerson, nominator