Woven into the Fabric of Diné Culture

Woven into the Fabric of Diné Culture

Darby Raymond-Overstreet (Diné) is a digital artist and printmaker. She received her B.A.s in Psychology and Studio Art and graduated with Honors from Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire in 2016. During her first time at the Santa Fe Indian Market (SWAIA) in 2018, she won multiple awards and received exposure in the Albuquerque Journal and Santa Fe New Mexican.

Darby is a 2019 First Peoples Fund Artist in Business Leadership Fellow and resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Ancestral Lands, Ancient Traditions

Ancestral Lands, Ancient Traditions

Deborah A. Jojola (Isleta Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo) is an expert in a variety of mediums — painting, frescos, printmaking, ceramics, and bookmaking, with a special interest in the process of lithography. She has shown her artwork at the Santa Fe Indian Market (SWAIA) for over 25 years and served as curator of exhibitions at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque. As an artist, she has worked nationally and internationally in Hawai’i, Canada, Russia, and Japan.

Deborah is a 2019 First Peoples Fund Cultural Capital Fellow and resides in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Dream Warriors Use Performance-Based Art to Create Pathways for Youth to Heal

Dream Warriors Use Performance-Based Art to Create Pathways for Youth to Heal

Dream Warriors is the subject of a case story First Peoples Fund has created with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. There will be an accompanying official written component for this video story. This case study is one of three focusing on how performing arts is creating healing pathways for Native youth into performing arts-based enterprises. These are rooted in traditional culture, knowledge, and values through performing arts, allowing them to reclaim, reconnect, and revitalize themselves and their culture in their communities.

Within, Together, Collective

Within, Together, Collective

First Peoples Fund (FPF), in partnership with the Black Hills Area Community Foundation, Bush Foundation, HRK Foundation, Johnson Scholarship Foundation, and Northwest Area Foundation, hosted a roundtable discussion this month. Titled Within, Together, Collective, the day was part of an ongoing conversation around the idea that now is the opportune time to thoughtfully deepen our collective efforts and investments in Native communities. Several intersecting bodies of research discussed throughout the day illustrated the urgency for, and challenges in, creating a more equitable future in which Native communities are not left out.

Walking with the Ancestors

Walking with the Ancestors

Ten years ago, Kamaliikupono Hanohano (Native Hawaiian) began a lifelong apprenticeship with Su‘a Sulu‘ape Keone Nunes (Native Hawaiian) in his traditional tattoo school known as Pāuhi where he teaches “Kākau uhi” which is generally defined as traditional Hawaiian tattooing.

Kamaliikupono is the youngest traditional Hawaiian tattoo artist today. He was awarded a 2019 First Peoples Fund Cultural Capital Fellowship to fund travel to conferences and materials needed to perpetuate this traditional practice.

Steel Medicine

Steel Medicine

Margaret Jacobs (St. Regis Mohawk Tribe) studied Studio Art at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, graduated with high honors for her thesis work, and received the prestigious Perspectives on Design award.

She works full-time in her art business, traveling throughout the U.S. for juried art markets, residencies, and shows. She currently acts as the secretary on the Board of Directors for the Native American Alumni Association at Dartmouth, and the Treasurer on the board of directors for CATV (Community Access Television).

Margaret’s 2019 First Peoples Fund Artist in Business Leadership program is funding a custom-built oven and spray booth in her home studio she shares with her husband in Enfield, New Hampshire.