Native Hawaiian

Ho'omai'ka'i 'ana, Cyril

Ho'omai'ka'i 'ana, Cyril

Two of First Peoples Fund’s Jennifer Easton Community Spirit Award honorees, Chilkat weaver Anna Brown Ehlers (Tlingit) and slack key guitar master Cyril Lani Pahinui (Native Hawaiian) received the 2017 National Endowment for the Arts' National Heritage Award, which were announced last week.

When we reached out to Cyril, a 2013 Community Spirit honoree, to congratulate him, he sent back the beautiful message below filled with aloha, love and community spirit, which we share with you. A post about Anna is coming soon. Cyril has been battling health issues and working composing and teaching from a hospital bed for more than a year.

Master Folk and Traditional Artists Receive Top Honor

Master Folk and Traditional Artists Receive Top Honor

First Peoples Fund is excited to share that two of our Jennifer Easton Community Spirit Award honorees have received the 2017 National Endowment for the Arts' National Heritage Award, announced last week. Chilkat weaver Anna Brown Ehlers (Tlingit) was a Community Spirit Award honoree in 2001, and slack key guitar master Cyril Lani Pahinui (Native Hawaiian) was a 2013 honoree. 

First Peoples Fund is all about Weaving our Partnerships

First Peoples Fund is all about Weaving our Partnerships

Late last month, FPF president Lori Pourier traveled to Honolulu where she attended the PA’I Foundation’s 2017 Mo’olelo Storytelling Festival. The festival included mo’olelo, a form of Hawaiian storytelling and a hallmark of the pre-contact Native Hawaiian oral tradition, as well as Native American and Tex-Mex story-telling traditions.

Carrying On

Carrying On

The aroma of beef stew and rice welcomed some of the greatest Hawaiian musicians to Cyril Lani Pahinui’s home as his father’s fame grew. The setting was perfect for the rejuvenation of Hawai’i musical traditions. But it wasn’t easy for Cyril to learn.

The Aloha Spirit, and a Satisfying Joy

The Aloha Spirit, and a Satisfying Joy

A simple stop for lunch with his hula halau (dance school) led to Kaloku Holt’s (Native Hawaiian) most rewarding experience as an artist. It happened at a restaurant on the Big Island when, over the radio, one of Kaloku’s original songs came on. The happiness it brought those around him showed he impacted people in a positive way. He will never forget that moment, fueling his drive to share the aloha spirit through his creations.

Standing on the Kumu's Shoulders

Standing on the Kumu's Shoulders

The class gathers and sits on mats to prepare for a lauhala weaving class. “Lauhala” simply means “leaf from a hala tree.” But this isn’t simply a craft class. There is protocol, an ancient way to approach this art that was taught to Duncan Ka’ohu Seto (Native Hawaiian) by master weavers of his time. Now Ka’ohu is a master weaver, and it is his turn to be the kumu, the teacher.

Native Hawaiian honored with Community Spirit Award during wearable fashion show in Hawaii

Native Hawaiian honored with Community Spirit Award during wearable fashion show in Hawaii

Keone Nunes (Native Hawaiian) prefers not to be in the spotlight, so the traditional tattoo artist said it was a little unnerving to be the center of attention at the recent MAMo Wearable Art Fashion Show in Honolulu.

Traditional Polynesian tattoo artist is 2015 Community Spirit Award honoree

Traditional Polynesian tattoo artist is 2015 Community Spirit Award honoree

When Keone Nunes (Native Hawaiian) wanted to get a traditional Polynesian tattoo, but couldn't find a tattoo artist in his native Hawaii that didn't use machines, he decided to take things in to his own hands.