Poetry

Bring the Noise

Bring the Noise

At the at the 20th Annual Brave New Voices International Poetry Slam Festival in San Francisco earlier this month, there were three-minute poetry performances by 600 young poets from around the world that were all at once heart-breaking, angry, angst-ful, joyful, and hopeful. There was loud music, dancing, high fives and other expressions of love and support across the room before the bouts began. There were chants of  “You fly,” “Art not ego,” “Don’t be nice, be nasty,” and “Go poet,” along with finger snaps, “mmmmm’s” of approval and lots more loud music before, during and after the bouts.

DANCES WITH WORDS POETS TRAVELING TO THE INTERNATIONAL STAGE AT BRAVE NEW VOICES

DANCES WITH WORDS POETS TRAVELING TO THE INTERNATIONAL STAGE AT BRAVE NEW VOICES


Move around the room, change the pace, make eye contact, don’t make eye contact. Feel the emotion — anger, sadness, joy. Where is it coming from? What part of you? Allow it to move you. 

Movement exercises at a recent poetry retreat showed the poets’ dedication and their willingness to be uncomfortable — in a good way — and put themselves into every word.

Now they are ready to travel to San Francisco

THE JOURNEY HOME: LAREE POURIER AND THE YOUTH SPEAKS FUTURE CORP FELLOWSHIP

THE JOURNEY HOME: LAREE POURIER AND THE YOUTH SPEAKS FUTURE CORP FELLOWSHIP

Through a two-year Youth Speaks Future Corp Fellowship at First Peoples Fund, Laree Pourier (Oglala Lakota) leads the Dances with Words program and is helping broaden young people’s experiences and their understanding of themselves — identity, oppression, and resistance. When these young Natives go to the Youth Speaks sponsored poetry slam, Brave New Voices (BNV), they hear young people from all over the world talking about the same issues.

RE-MEMBERING LIFE

RE-MEMBERING LIFE

A mosaic of memories, the way the mind protects from pains of the past. Tanaya Winder (Duckwater Shoshone Tribe) knows someone has to dive headfirst into this muck and darkness to bring forth hope and beauty. She pieces together memories to answer questions in life, to re-member and to explore healing words through poetry. She writes from a place of love.

A QUILTED POEM

A QUILTED POEM

Tasha Abourezk (Three Affiliated Tribes), 2017 Cultural Capital Fellow, uses textiles to explore her Mandan/Hidatsa heritage as well as contemporary politics. She stitches culture and textiles together, leaving the viewer to question deeper realities behind the work.

Bold Young Poets from Pine Ridge Visit the Nation's Capitol

Bold Young Poets from Pine Ridge Visit the Nation's Capitol

A Dances with Words™ poet ended the “I Too Am American” session with his poem “You Call Me Indian.” At the Brave New Voices (BNV) competition in Washington, D.C., fingers snapped in approval during his performance, where Marcus Ruff (17, Oglala Lakota) alone represented North American Indigenous people.